Convenience is key as vaccination efforts ramp up in schools in Northern Kentucky

The effort to immunize more children is spreading to schools in northern Kentucky, reaching hundreds of people ages 12 and older. As part of the event in Ryle, 177 students lined up to get vaccinated. “I hope we can stop wearing these masks. I would like to see people smile. I would love to see people laugh, ”said Casey Collins, Ryle senior. Collins said he was able to get the shot earlier and with less hassle than if it wasn’t given at his school. I loved that it is convenient. I can do this during the school day. I don’t have to go to a doctor’s office and waste a lot of time that way, ”Collins said. I didn’t have to go out of my way to go elsewhere to get it. I was already in school, ”said Allen Coleman, senior at Ryle. Wild Health is hired by Kentucky to deliver COVID-19 vaccines statewide. Some researchers believe that herd immunity can be achieved, but children will be needed to do so. The FDA has given emergency clearance for the use of the Pfizer vaccine up to the age of 12. Ryle principal Matt Shafer said immunizing children was a major part of getting classrooms back to normal next year, and he said masks and virtual learning have created challenges. make everyone who had appointments in about an hour. “Just to start next year with communication, the human interaction is going to be great, and it’s going to be a big step towards that,” “I think you’ll see the kind of return to normal that we were hoping for in the summer. last, I think we’ll definitely see that this summer, ”said Ryle senior Wyatt Stephens.

The effort to immunize more children is spreading to schools in northern Kentucky, reaching hundreds of people ages 12 and older.

Wild Health hosted pop-up clinics at Cooper High School, Ockerman Middle School, Gray Middle School and Ryle High School on Thursday.

Inside the event in Ryle, 177 students lined up to get vaccinated.

“I hope we can stop wearing these masks. I would like to see people smile. I would love to see people laugh, ”said Casey Collins, Ryle senior.

Collins said he was able to get the vaccine earlier and with less hassle than he would have if it wasn’t for his school.

“It’s good. I loved that it’s convenient. I can do it during the school day. I don’t have to go to a doctor and waste a lot of time that way. Collins said.

“I didn’t have to do my best to go anywhere else to get it. I was already in school, ”said Allen Coleman, senior at Ryle.

Wild Health is contracted by Kentucky to administer COVID-19 vaccines statewide. Some researchers believe that herd immunity can be achieved, but that children will be needed to do so.

The FDA has given emergency clearance for the use of the Pfizer vaccine up to the age of 12. A new EUA could be given to extend vaccines to children from the age of 5 by the end of the summer.

Ryle principal Matt Shafer has said getting children vaccinated is a major part of getting classrooms back to normal next year.

He said the masks and virtual learning have created challenges.

Shafer directed the students to tables where Wild Health staff members were able to make anyone who had appointments in about an hour.

“Just to start next year with communication, the human interaction is going to be great, and it will be a big step in that direction,”

“I think you will see the kind of return to normal that we were hoping for last summer, I think we will definitely see that this summer,” said senior Ryle Wyatt Stephens.

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